Filipino-Style Fried Chicken in Las Vegas

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MAX’S FRIED CHICKEN

 

 

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Max’s Restaurant of the Philippines, an institution back home with 160 outlets, recently opened its first branch in Las Vegas. And with Max’s comes its signature dish, Pinoy “Max’s Fried Chicken”  – unbreaded, marinated in fish sauce and ginger, then fried till the skin turns cordovan and crisp and the butter-soft meat underneath slips off the bone.  –  Source

 

 


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The cuisine of the Philippines shouldn’t be one of the most distant, exotic or under-represented types of food in Las Vegas, but that’s the way it seems. Last year the Las Vegas Sun reported the Filipino population in Clark County is more than 86,000. And while there are Filipino restaurants sprinkled around the Valley, they don’t attract much interest from non-Filipino eaters who are more likely to experiment with other Asian or Latin cuisines. Maybe the arrival of Max’s will change that.

Newly opened in a former Lone Star Steakhouse across the street from the Clark County Library, Max’s is a long-successful family restaurant chain from the Philippines that has expanded to California and, in recent years, taken hold in other North American cities like New Jersey and Ontario, as well as the Hawaiian islands. It specializes in fried chicken, which is always good news to me, and plenty of other hearty, homey dishes that look and taste like they were prepared in a friend’s home. This makes sense; every time I’ve asked any local where to find the best Filipino food in town, the answer is always the same: “My house.”

Max’s incredibly crispy, non-breaded fried chicken is the perfect portal into this soulful, satisfying cuisine. A half-chicken combo meal is a ton of food, all the best parts of the bird with soup or salad, rice or fries and a caramel bar for dessert.  –  Source

 

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The lumpiang Shanghai seemed the way to go. They were excellent, testament to the cravings expatriates are known to get. The extra-crunchy wrappers enfolded a mixture of ground pork and vegetables, and the sweet-and-sour sauce on the side provided an extra jot of flavor that wasn’t even needed.  Source

 

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